(BTAC) NOTICE OF THE CITT REVIEW OF THE BICYCLES ANTIDUMPING DUTIES ORDER

On August 8, 2013, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (CITT) initiated an Interim Review of the Order it made on December 7, 2012, in respect of

the dumping of bicycles, assembled or unassembled, with wheel diameters of 16 inches (40.64 cm) and greater, originating in or exported from Chinese Taipei and the People’s Republic of China, excluding bicycles with an FOB Chinese Taipei or the People’s Republic of China selling price exceeding CAN$225 and excluding bicycles with foldable frames and stems.

In the Order it made only eight months ago, the CITT extended bicycle antidumping duties for another 5 years, until 2017.  The CITT is reviewing this Order, on its own initiative, because of recent decisions by a manufacture to close its plant in Canada.

This is good news for BTAC members because it provides an opportunity to eliminate two unproductive government cost burdens in our industry.

First, after over two decades of dealing with costly, time-consuming, and disruptive dumping duties, we can now work with government to eliminate these duties once and for all.

Second, the CITT has stated that the purpose of its Review is to determine if the Order should be rescinded on the basis that there is no longer any domestic production of bicycles.  If we can persuade the CITT to conclude that domestic production has ceased, the CITT’s Decision will serve as compelling evidence in our campaign to eliminate the 13% bicycles Customs Tariff.

Getting rid of the 13% Tariff, and the bicycle dumping duties, will lower government costs in our industry, which will be good for all. 

We are therefore asking you to support BTAC’s efforts to eliminate these two layers of costly government levies, and to provide us with any evidence you have to support our submission that domestic production of bicycles has ceased in Canada.

We appreciate your assistance and will continue to keep you posted on our efforts in this regard and any other matters that have an impact on the cycling industry in Canada.

We have retained the legal services of Mr. James McIlroy who is very well known to many of you and very familiar with our industry and the CITT process generally.

Please do not hesitate to contact me, should you have any questions or concerns.

Bill Yetman
Executive Director

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On August 8, 2013, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (CITT) initiated an Interim Review of the Order it made on December 7, 2012, in respect of

 

the dumping of bicycles, assembled or unassembled, with wheel diameters of 16 inches (40.64 cm) and greater, originating in or exported from Chinese Taipei and the People’s Republic of China, excluding bicycles with an FOB Chinese Taipei or the People’s Republic of China selling price exceeding CAN$225 and excluding bicycles with foldable frames and stems.

 

In the Order it made only eight months ago, the CITT extended bicycle antidumping duties for another 5 years, until 2017.  The CITT is reviewing this Order, on its own initiative, because of recent decisions by a manufacture to close its plant in Canada.

 

This is good news for BTAC members because it provides an opportunity to eliminate two unproductive government cost burdens in our industry.

 

First, after over two decades of dealing with costly, time-consuming, and disruptive dumping duties, we can now work with government to eliminate these duties once and for all.

 

Second, the CITT has stated that the purpose of its Review is to determine if the Order should be rescinded on the basis that there is no longer any domestic production of bicycles.  If we can persuade the CITT to conclude that domestic production has ceased, the CITT’s Decision will serve as compelling evidence in our campaign to eliminate the 13% bicycles Customs Tariff.

 

Getting rid of the 13% Tariff, and the bicycle dumping duties, will lower government costs in our industry, which will be good for all. 

 

We are therefore asking you to support BTAC’s efforts to eliminate these two layers of costly government levies, and to provide us with any evidence you have to support our submission that domestic production of bicycles has ceased in Canada.

 

We appreciate your assistance and will continue to keep you posted on our efforts in this regard and any other matters that have an impact on the cycling industry in Canada.

 

We have retained the legal services of Mr. James McIlroy who is very well known to many of you and very familiar with our industry and the CITT process generally.

 

Please do not hesitate to contact me, should you have any questions or concerns.

 

Bill Yetman

Executive Director